More publications, conferences, and another win

Emily Choate and Terri Shrum Stoor have been selected to attend the 2014 Sewanee Writers’ Conference! Emily, along with Maurice Carlos Ruffin and Dana Glass, has also been selected to attend the Tin House Summer Writers’ Workshop. Other Peauxdunque travels to summer workshops include Terri, J.Ed. Marston, and Susan Bennett Vallee attending the Yokshop Writers’ Workshop in Oxford, Mississippi.

On the publications front, Emily has two recent reviews out on Chapter 16.org: one of Tupelo Honey Cafe: New Southern Flavors from the Blue Ridge Mountains; and one of Southern Sin: True Stories of the Sultry South and Women Behaving Badly, an essay anthology edited by Beth Ann Fennelly.

Also, the wonderful book, Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas, containing Maurice‘s excellent essay on the St. Claude Avenue corridor, has been selected as the book for the 2014 One Book One New Orleans project.

Among recent competition wins and awards by Peauxdunquians lately, Tad Bartlett‘s story, “Superpowerless,” received the Svenson Award for Fiction, awarded annually by the UNO Creative Writing Workshop. We also have news of another incredible competition win by a Peauxdunque denizen, but have to hold our huzzahs until that competition makes its official announcement; but when it comes, we’ll share a behind-the-scenes story of how it came to be. Stay tuned!

A busy start to 2014 in Peauxdunque

There’ve been lots of doings in the land of Peauxdunque to begin 2014.

Susan Kagan has inked a book deal with Left Hand Press for her book, Avoiding a Perilous Path: Basic Wiccan Ethics, a book examining every mundane aspect of ethical behavior in a Wiccan’s life, from birth to death and all the epiphanies and drudgeries in between. Publication will be no later than early 2015.

Maurice Carlos Ruffin has learned that his short story, “Catch What You Can,” will be published this May in issue 11.2 of Redivider.

New Peauxdunquian Geoff Munsterman has been all over the place, presenting readings from his new collection, Because the Stars Shine Through It, including at the AllWays Lounge, at the “Meet the Authors of Lavender Ink” event at Faulkner House Books, and as a featured author, along with Maurice, at the upcoming Pine Street Salon hosted by Rodger Kamenetz and Moira Crone.

Tad Bartlett learned in January that his short story, “Superpowerless,” received an Honorable Mention designation in the November 2013 Glimmer Train Short Story Award for New Writers.

Emily Choate continued her great series with Chapter 16, posting a review of Charles McNair’s Pickett’s Charge, his first book since his Pulitzer-nominated Land O’ Goshen nineteen years ago.

Tom Carson continues to write his insightful film and cultural criticism for The American Prospect and GQ, including his touching obituary in GQ for Philip Seymour Hoffman.

And L. Kasimu Harris had a successful solo exhibition of his photography at the Bellocq lounge, titled “Dreams Do Come True.” Proving the truth of that title, Kasimu also emcee’d the “Haute & Handmade” event, a showcase of Southern costume couture, at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art on January 24.

MORE TO COME!

Come see what’s happening in Peauxdunque. Really, you could spend a whole day with us.

Sometimes it’s hard to keep up with everything happening in the land of Peauxdunque. It’s a wild and varied place, populated by writers who never stop. Since our last update in the far-distant past of early December, here’s the latest:

Tom Carson‘s novel, Daisy Buchanan’s Daughter, has been re-released by River House Publishing in a two-volume set: Cadwaller’s Gun and Carole Lombard’s Plane.

Emily Choate has published a fantastic Q&A with Roger Hodge, new editor of Oxford American, on Chapter 16.

Liz Gruder‘s YA fantasy, Starseed, has been released by WiDo Publishing.

Terri Stoor‘s award-winning essay, Bird Dog, has been published in Quarterly West.

The first season of Denise Moore‘s excellent web series, Neutral Grounds, is now available for viewing.

Tad Bartlett‘s essays on the Oxford American website have taken a short break from the “Food and …” series, and now include an essay on music and the recovery from Hurricane Katrina, run in conjunction with the magazine’s Louisiana Music issue.

J.Ed. Marston published an op-ed piece in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on progressive development of communities of technology entrepreneurs in Chattanooga.

At the beginning of February, Peauxdunque took the show on the road for their annual retreat, this time to Peauxdunque, Tennessee. Another post will follow soon. Come back to visit!